Westchester-Putnam Council, BSA What is Cub Scouting? wpcbsa.org 

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For over 80 years, Cub Scouts have been having the time of their lives making new friends and learning new things in an environment designed to help them succeed. From building his own pinewood derby® car to learning how to roast the perfect marshmallow with his best friends at a family campout, your child will LOVE being a Cub Scout. So if he's in the first through fifth grades, or 7 to 10 years old, then it's time for him to have some fun … with the Cub Scouts.

Join Cub Scouting! - This Web site will help you learn all about the Cub Scouting program and how you can join in the fun.



Cub Scouting Badges

Tiger Cubs
Tiger Cubs


Bobcat
First Rank

Wolf
Wolf

Bear
Bear

Webelos
Webelos

Arrow of Light
Arrow of Light
Cub Scouting's
highest award

What to Expect

When you join the Boy Scouts of America, Scouting is like an extension of your family: It follows your values, it sees to the overall care and well-being of your child, and it's always there for you. It's not an either/or choice you have to make for your child. It works with you to let you manage your time and other activities and will always be there when you return.

Maturity. Youth experience dramatic physical and emotional growth. Scouting offers them opportunities to channel much of that change into productive endeavors. Through service projects and Good Turns, Scouts can discover their place in the community. Many Scouting activities allow youth to associate with others from different backgrounds. The religious emblems program offers pathways for Scouts to more deeply understand their duty to God. The unit provides each Scout with an opportunity to explore, to try out new ideas, and to embark on adventures that sometimes have no design other than to have a good time with good people.

Flexibility. The Scouting programs are flexible and accommodate the need to balance the work and life requirements of a busy family. It's easy to plan for meetings and activities, and if something unexpected comes up, just let your leader know—it's expected in the lives we live today.

Adaptability. Your child can work on achievements at his or her own pace. For example, if your child is in a spring soccer league and has to miss several meetings and activities, he or she still can complete and sign off on Scout activities to work toward the next level.

Transferability. The skills and values your child learns through Scouting can be applied in any non-Scouting activity he or she participates in. As your child builds character, this can be an especially valuable defense to the peer pressure all youth experience when growing up.

The Purposes of Cub Scouting
The Cub Scouting program has 10 purposes related to the overall mission of the Boy Scouts of America – to build character, learn citizenship, and develop personal fitness:

1. Character Development
2. Spiritual Growth
3. Good Citizenship
4. Sportsmanship and Fitness
5. Family Understanding
6. Respectful Relationships
7. Personal Achievement
8. Friendly Service
9. Fun and Adventure
10. Preparation for Boy Scouts

Every Cub Scouting activity should help fulfill one of these purposes. When considering a new activity, ask which purpose or purposes it supports. Not everything in Cub Scouting has to be serious – far from it! Silly songs, energetic games, and yummy snacks all have their place in the program.

Membership
Cub Scouting has program components for boys in the first through fifth grades (or ages 7, 8, 9, or 10). Members join a Cub Scout pack and are assigned to a den, usually a neighborhood group of six to eight boys. First-grade boys (Tiger Cubs) meet twice a month, while Wolf Cub Scouts (second graders), Bear Cub Scouts (third graders), and Webelos Scouts (fourth and fifth graders) meet weekly.

Once a month, all of the dens and family members gather for a pack meeting under the direction of a Cubmaster and pack committee. The committee includes parents of boys in the pack and members of the chartered organization.

The Methods of Cub Scouting
To accomplish its purposes and achieve the overall goals of building character, learning citizenship, and developing personal fitness, Cub Scouting uses seven methods:

1. Living the Ideals
Cub Scouting’s values are embedded in the Cub Scout Promise, the Law of the Pack, the Cub Scout motto, and the Cub Scout sign, handshake, and salute. These practices help establish and reinforce the program’s values in boys and the leaders who guide them.

2. Belonging to a Den
The den—a group of six to eight boys who are about the same age—is the place where Cub Scouting starts. In the den, Cub Scouts develop new skills and interests, they practice sportsmanship and good citizenship, and they learn to do their best, not just for themselves but for the den as well.

3. Using Advancement
Recognition is important to boys. The advancement plan provides fun for the boys, gives them a sense of personal achievement as they earn badges, and strengthens family understanding as adult family members and their den leader work with boys on advancement projects.

4. Involving Family and Home
Whether a Cub Scout lives with two parents or one, a foster family, or other relatives, his family is an important part of Cub Scouting. Parents and adult family members provide leadership and support for Cub Scouting and help ensure that boys have a good experience in the program.

5. Participating in Activities
Cub Scouts participate in a huge array of activities, including games, projects, skits, stunts, songs, outdoor activities, trips and service projects. Besides being fun, these activities offer opportunities for growth, achievement, and family involvement.

6. Serving Home and Neighborhood
Cub Scouting focuses on the home and neighborhood. It helps boys strengthen connections to their local communities, which in turn support the boys’ growth and development.

7. Wearing the Uniform
Cub Scout uniforms serve a dual purpose, demonstrating membership in the group (everyone is dressed alike) and individual achievement (boys wear the badges they’ve earned). Wearing the uniform to meetings and activities also encourages a neat appearance, a sense of belonging, and good behavior.

8. Making Character Connections
Throughout the program, leaders learn to identify and use character lessons in activities so boys can learn to know, commit, and practice the 12 core values of Cub Scouting.  Character Connections are included in all the methods of Cub Scouting and are the program themes for monthly pack meetings.

Cub Scouting is an active program. Boys learn by doing, and there's no end to the fun things that Cub Scouts do in their dens, as a pack, and at special events. With activities held at every level—family, den, and pack—Cub Scouting provides a year-round program of fun and learning for boys and their families.

 

 

A Family Program
Family involvement is essential to Cub Scouting's success. When we talk about "family" in Cub Scouting, we're sensitive to the realities of present-day families. Many Cub Scouts do not come from traditional two-parent homes. Some boys live with a single parent or with other relatives or guardians. Cub Scouting considers a boy's family to be the people with whom he lives.

Family Activities            http://www.scouting.org/sitecore/content/Home/CubScouts/Parents/FamilyProgram/family.aspx
As a program for the entire family, Cub Scouting can help families teach their children a wholesome system of values and beliefs while building and strengthening relationships among family members.

 

Cub Scout Activities
Cub Scout Camping
 Learn to live in the outdoors. Camping takes you on exciting adventures into the natural world and beyond. Cub Scouts learn to respect nature and become good citizens in the outdoors.

Cub Scout Derbies
Racing in a Cub Scout derby is great fun. You'll get to design your racing vehicle, work with a parent to build it, and see it perform on race day. Win or lose, you'll take pride in having done your best. When you race in a Cub Scout derby, you learn craft skills, the rules of fair play, and good sportsmanship—things you will remember all your life.

Outings and Field Trips
 "Outing" is a big part of Scouting. Cub Scouts get out and about with many kinds of outdoor fun, such as field Service Projects

Excursions and field trips provide some of the most exciting parts of Scouting. Cub Scouts enjoy many outdoor experiences as they participate in the variety of activities that can be held outside, such as field trips, hikes, nature and conservation experiences, and outdoor games.

Den and Pack Meetings
 Den meetings are the stepping-stones by which a boy progresses through the Cub Scout program. At pack meetings, families celebrate their achievements along the way.

Each week, your son attends a den meeting with a small group of boys in his grade level. The meeting is conducted by a den leader and an assistant. The den may meet at the home of one of the leaders or at another suitable location. Tiger Cubs attend their den meetings with their adult partners, but Wolf and Bear Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts attend den meetings on their own.

While the meetings include games and other activities that are fun for the boys, program delivery is the main goal. Boys participate in activities and work on projects that are related to a monthly theme and that help them learn the skills they need to progress in rank. The boys also prepare to do their part in the monthly pack meeting.

The monthly pack meeting brings together boys from every den, their leaders, and their families for a large-scale event that showcases all that the boys have learned and done in their individual den meetings. Such a gathering gives the boys a larger experience beyond their own den. It also helps them see how their individual activities fit into the bigger Cub Scout program.

Blue and Gold Banquets
Most Cub Scouts celebrate Scouting Anniversary Week in February with a "birthday party" called the blue and gold banquet. In nearly all packs, the blue and gold banquet is the highlight of the year. It brings families together for an evening of fun and cheer. It's often the pack meeting for February.

The purpose of the blue and gold banquet is to celebrate the pack's anniversary, thank pack leaders and other adults who have helped the pack, and inspire the leaders, Scouts, and parents. Packs often like to invite former members and other Scouting or community leaders to take part in their blue and gold banquet.
The banquet can be like a regular pack meeting, with songs, skits, stunts, and awards. Or it can be something different and a little more special. Your pack may decide to bring in an entertainer such as a magician or a storyteller. Or you could have a video or slide show of what the pack did over the past year.

Service Projects
Doing service projects together is one way that Cub Scouts keep their promise "to help other people." While a Scout should do his best to help other people every day, a group service project is a bigger way to help people. While you're giving service, you're learning to work together with others to do something that's good for your community.

District and Council Activities
Your local council or district office may schedule activities in which all the packs in your area are invited to participate. Some examples are Cub Scout day camps, Scoutoramas, Scouting shows, conservation projects, outdoor Cub Scout field days, Cub Scout circuses, district summer softball leagues, etc. At Westchester-Putnam Council, we support a wide variety of district and council activities, including district pinewood derby races, winter Klondike races and our council Thunderbird Games.

 

Uniform & Awards
Wearing a uniform gives youth and adult members a sense of identification and commitment to the goals of character development, citizenship training, and personal fitness. The awards displayed on the uniform mark significant milestones in every Scout and leader's progress in achieving these goals and successfully practicing Scouting's ideals.

The Cub Scout Uniform            http://www.scouting.org/sitecore/content/Home/CubScouts/Parents/Awards/Parents.aspx
Learn more about the uniform worn by all Cub Scouts: its purposes, parts, and proper use, as well as tips for obtaining a uniform for your son.

 

Membership
Cub Scouting has program components for boys in the first through fifth grades (or ages 7, 8, 9, or 10). Members join a Cub Scout pack and are assigned to a den, usually a neighborhood group of six to eight boys. First-grade boys (Tiger Cubs) meet twice a month, while Wolf Cub Scouts (second graders), Bear Cub Scouts (third graders), and Webelos Scouts (fourth and fifth graders) meet weekly.
Once a month, all of the dens and family members gather for a pack meeting under the direction of a Cubmaster and pack committee. The committee includes parents of boys in the pack and members of the chartered organization.

Cub Scout membership* is:
223,003           Tiger Cubs
747,429           Cub Scouts
612,743           Webelos Scouts
45,962             Packs
424,944           Pack Leaders
 
* As of December 31, 2011

 

Volunteer Leadership
Thousands of volunteer leaders, both men and women, are involved in the Cub Scout program. They serve in a variety of positions, as everything from unit leaders to pack committee chairmen, committee members, den leader coaches, and chartered organization representatives. Cub Scouting's volunteer leaders work with boys and their families to improve their communities by enriching the lives of the families who live there. Cub Scout leaders support the family. They take an active part in helping to strengthen families and their boys by providing a fun-filled, worthwhile program that teaches values.

If you are a new leader in Cub Scouting, here are some key resources that you should review so that you can get your den or pack up and running, right from the start.

 

Becoming a Leader
Cub Scouting relies on volunteers to be pack leaders. Volunteers come from all backgrounds and experiences. Plumbers, lawyers, homemakers, teachers, doctors, janitors, and scientists—people from just about every occupation imaginable—are involved in leading youth to become responsible, caring, and competent citizens. They also quickly discover that Scout volunteering lets them learn new skills and build lifelong friendships while having fun.

Leadership Roles
Some of the roles you might fill to support a Cub Scout pack are these:

■ Cubmaster. The Cubmaster's most visible duty is to emcee the monthly pack meeting. Behind the scenes, the Cubmaster works with the pack committee to plan and carry out the pack program and helps coordinate the efforts of the den leaders. A Cubmaster may be assisted by one or more assistant Cubmasters.

■ Den Leader. The den leader conducts weekly meetings for a smaller group of boys and helps coordinate the den's contribution to the monthly pack meeting. A den leader is typically assisted by at least one assistant den leader.

■ Pack Committee. The pack committee works with the Cubmaster to plan and carry out the pack program. The committee also coordinates major events and secures support for the pack. The committee consists of a chairperson and other members who may have particular functions, such as finance, marketing, advancement, or outdoor program.

■ Function Committees. Some pack events have special-purpose committees. Holding a Scouting for Food drive, pinewood derby, blue and gold banquet, pack graduation, or field day requires more planning and coordination than a typical pack meeting.

■ Parent Helpers. Some events need extra adults to help the pack leaders. A parent can pitch in by driving a vehicle for a field trip, helping prepare lunch at a day camp, supervising an event at a field day, or supporting unit leaders on an as-needed basis.

Requirements
Any parent or chartered organization member is usually welcome to pitch in and help with the pack, and there are no formal requirements for periodic or temporary assignments. But to serve in an ongoing role, you must register as an adult volunteer with the Boy Scouts of America by submitting an adult leader application.

This application must be approved by the pack, the local council, and the national office. The requirements are fairly straightforward:
■ You must be 21 years of age or older. (For some positions, such as assistant Cubmaster or assistant den leader, the minimum age is 18.)

■ You must be a U.S. citizen or legal resident.

■ You must agree to abide by the Scout Oath and Law and subscribe to the Declaration of Religious Principle.

■ You must be a person of good moral character and satisfactorily pass a criminal background check.

In some cases, being highly active in the pack or chartered organization, having experience working with youth, and having specialized skills can also be beneficial, but are not strictly required.

New Leader Brochures
This series of brochures was designed to provide an at-a-glance orientation for new Cub Scout leaders.

So You're a New Tiger Cub Den Leader (No. 510-233) [PDF] http://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/510-233.pdf

So You're a New Cub Scout Den Leader (No. 510-239) [PDF] http://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/510-239.pdf

So You're a New Webelos Den Leader (No. 510-247) [PDF] http://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/510-247.pdf

So You're a New Cubmaster (No. 510-237) [PDF] http://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/510-237.pdf

So You're a New Pack Committee Member (No. 510-240) [PDF] http://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/510-240.pdf

Cub Scout Leader Fast Start
This online training is provided to help you understand and carry out your responsibilities as a new den leader, pack leader, or committee member. Be sure to review it before your first meeting. 
http://www.scouting.org/scoutsource/sitecore/content/Scouting/Training/Adult.aspx

Den & Pack Meeting Resource Guide
The Den & Pack Meeting Resource Guide is designed to help prepare you for your den and pack meetings and to provide you with the tools necessary to advance your boys along the Cub Scout advancement trail while having fun. Below you will find the contents of the Resource Guide in an online form.

http://www.scouting.org/scoutsource/CubScouts/Leaders/DenLeaderResources/DenandPackMeetingResourceGuide/DenMeetingPlans.aspx

Like other phases of the Scouting program, Cub Scouting is made available to groups having similar interests and goals, including professional organizations, government bodies, and religious, educational, civic, fraternal, business, labor, and citizens' groups. These "sponsors" are called chartered organizations. Each organization appoints one of its members as a chartered organization representative. The organization, through the pack committee, is responsible for providing leadership, the meeting place, and support materials for pack activities.

 

Who Pays for It?
Groups responsible for supporting Cub Scouting are the boys and their parents, the pack, the chartered organization, and the community. The boy is encouraged to pay his own way by contributing dues each week. Packs also obtain income by working on approved money-earning projects. The community, including parents, supports Cub Scouting through the United Way, Friends of Scouting enrollment, bequests, and special contributions to the BSA local council. This financial support provides leadership training, outdoor programs, council service centers and other facilities, and professional service for units.

 

Advancement Plan
Recognition is important to young boys. The Cub Scout advancement plan provides fun for the boys, gives them a sense of personal achievement as they earn badges, and strengthens family understanding as adult family members work with boys on advancement projects.
On the advancement trail, a Cub Scout progresses from rank to rank, learning new skills as he goes. Each of the ranks and awards in Cub Scouting has its own requirements. As you advance through the ranks, the requirements get more challenging, to match the new skills and abilities you learn as you get older.

Bobcat
The first rank, Bobcat rank is for all boys who join Cub Scouting. Boys in Cub Scouting work on advancement with their families. No matter what age or grade a boy joins Cub Scouting, he must earn his Bobcat badge before he can advance to Tiger Cub, Wolf, Bear or Webelos Scout. The “trail” to Bobcat has eight “tracks”, including learning the Cub Scout Promise, handshake, salute and motto.

Tiger
Tiger Cubs BSA is a simple and fun program for first-grade boys and their families. The Tiger Cub program introduces boys and their adult partners to the excitement of Cub Scouting as they "Search, Discover, and Share" together.

This is the first rank achieved as a Cub Scout. The Scout must complete five achievements on the Tiger Cub trail in order to earn the Tiger Cub badge. Each achievement has three activities: one to be completed with the family, one with the den, and a “Go See It!” activity, or field trip. Once a boy has earned his Tiger Cub badge, he can complete various electives to earn Tiger Track beads. The Tiger Cub program provides opportunities for the Scout to learn and grow while having fun along with you.

Tiger Cubs BSA follows a school-year cycle. Boys remain in the Tiger Cub program until they complete first grade. At that time, they graduate into a Cub Scout den and are eligible to participate in Cub Scout summer activities, including Cub Scout day camp.

Wolf
The Wolf program is for boys who have completed first grade (or are age 8). To earn the Wolf badge, a boy must pass twelve achievements involving simple physical and mental skills. 

The trail to the rank of Wolf Cub Scout is more challenging with 12 achievements, each with multiple tracks. Achievements include more physical activity in “Feats of Skill”, learning about safety in “Know Your Home and Community” and reacting to various situations in “Making Choices.” After earning the Wolf badge, Scouts complete various electives to earn gold and silver arrow points to proudly wear on their uniform shirt.

At the Wolf rank, Scouts may also participate in the Cub Scout Academics and Sports program to earn special recognition belt loops and pins, just by learning about and participating in an academic subject or sport.

Bear
The Bear rank is for boys who have completed second grade (or are age 9). There are twenty-four Bear achievements in four different categories. The Cub Scout must complete twelve of these to earn the Bear badge. These requirements are somewhat more difficult and challenging than those for Wolf rank.

The Bear trail achievements are in four categories: God, Country, Family and Self. Achievements include: “Ways We Worship,” “Take Care of Your Planet,” “Family Fun,” and “Be a Leader”. Bear Cub Scouts also have the opportunity to earn arrow points and participate in the Cub Scout Academics and Sports program.

Webelos
This program is for boys who have completed third grade (or are age 10).  Webelos (from “WE’ll BE LOyal Scouts,” pronounced WEE-buh-lows) is a transitional program that shifts the emphasis from the home-centered activities of Tiger Cub and Wolf and Bear Scouts to more group-centered activities.

A boy may begin working on the Webelos badge as soon as he joins a Webelos den. This is the first step in his transition from the Webelos den to the Boy Scout troop. As he completes the requirements found in the Webelos Scout Book, he will work on activity badges, attend meetings led by adults, and become familiar with the Boy Scout requirements - all leading to the Arrow of Light Award.

This stage prepares the Scout for participation in the great adventure of Boy Scouting by providing boys with a variety of new experiences to help them assume responsibilities and gain maturity, knowledge and skills.

Advancement and recognition are based on earning the Webelos badge and activity badges. After the Webelos badge, the Scout can continue working toward the Arrow of Light Award, Cub Scouting’s highest award.

 

Cub Scout Academics and Sports
The Cub Scout Sports and Academics program provides the opportunity for boys to learn new techniques, develop sportsmanship, increase scholarship skills, and have fun. Participation in the program allows boys to be recognized for physical fitness and talent-building activities.

The Academics and Sports program gives Cub Scouts extra recognition activities to earn. In Academics subjects and Sports, Cub Scouts learn new skills, become better scholars, learn sportsmanship, and have fun. You can get to know a sport or an academic subject that's new to you --maybe astronomy, chess, computers, science; golf, hiking, tennis, or skateboarding to name a few in the program.

Belt loops and pins are a great way to help fulfill the aims of Scouting—build character, develop citizenship, and encourage mental and physical fitness.  Through a variety of subjects, you can stretch your mind and abilities by exploring the wonders of science, learning about the world, and expanding skills in new areas.

This is a chance to try something new, do your best, and earn recognition all at the same time.

Academics and Sports Belt Loops
You earn a belt loop to wear with your uniform when you complete three specific requirements for each Academics or Sports activity. You can take part in three ways: (1) by yourself or with your family, (2) in your den or pack, or (3) in school.

Academics and Sports Letter and Pins
Once you have earned the belt loop, you can stop. But if you want to do more with the activity, you may complete extra requirements to earn a pin.

A good place to display Academics and Sports pins is on the Academics and Sports letter. You can wear the letter on a sweater or a jacket, or display or frame it. The letter does not go on the Cub Scout uniform. There are no special requirements for earning the letter, because it's just for displaying the pins.

 

Camping
Age-appropriate camping programs are packed with theme-oriented action that brings Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts into the world of imagination. Day camping comes to the boy in neighborhoods across the country; resident camping is at least a three-day experience in which Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts camp within a developed theme of adventure and excitement. "Cub Scout Worlds" are used by many councils to carry the world of imagination into reality with actual theme structures of castles, forts, ships, etc. Cub Scout pack members enjoy camping in local council camps and council-approved national, state, county, or city parks. Camping programs combine fun and excitement with doing one's best, getting along with others, and developing an appreciation for ecology and the world of the outdoors.
Camping takes you on exciting adventures into the natural world. You'll learn to live with others in the out-of-doors. You'll learn to be a good citizen of the outdoors.

Camping is fun, and it's good for your mind, body, and spirit. It helps you learn to rely on yourself—on your own skills and knowledge. When you go camping as a Cub Scout, you get skills you will learn and use more, later, as a Boy Scout.

Cub Scout camping has day camps, resident camps, Webelos den overnight campouts, family camps, and pack overnighters.

Day Camps
Day camp lasts for one day to five days. It's for Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, and Webelos Scouts. Day camps are held during the day or early evening. Campers do not stay overnight. Westchester-Putnam Council has a number of wonderful day camp opportunities to choose from, all nationally accredited-see our Day Camp selections.

Resident Camps
At resident camps, Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts camp overnight. Every year, the resident camp has a different theme and different adventures. Examples of themes are Sea Adventure, Space Adventure, Athletes, Knights, Circus Big Top, American Indian Heritage, Folklore, and the World Around Us. Westchester-Putnam Council offers two separate weeks of camping at Read Scout Reservation in the Adirondack Mountains; Cub Scout Resident Camp and Webelos Resident Camp

Webelos Den Overnight Campouts
Webelos dens go on overnight campouts. Each Webelos Scout camps with his parent or guardian. The campers learn the basics of Boy Scout camping, under the direction of the Webelos den leader. Sometimes, leaders from a Boy Scout troop may join you. Webelos leaders must be certified in BALOO (Basic Adult Leader Outdoor Orientation) and Outdoor Leader Skills for Webelos Leaders is strongly recommended.

Webelos dens also have joint overnight campouts with a Boy Scout troop. Each Webelos Scout has a parent or guardian with him on these joint campouts, too.

Council-Organized Family Camps
Family camps are overnight camps for more than one Cub Scout pack. You may hear these events called "parent-pal weekends" or "adventure weekends." Each Cub Scout and Webelos Scout camps with a parent or guardian. Westchester-Putnam Council runs 2 Family Camping Weekends.

Pack Overnighters
Packs on their own can hold overnight campouts for the families in the pack. Cub Scouts' brothers and sisters can go on these pack overnighters. In most cases, each Scout will camp with a parent or guardian. Every young camper is responsible to a specific adult. At least one adult must be certified in BALOO (Basic Adult Leader Outdoor Orientation).

 

Publications
Volunteers are informed of national news and events through Scouting magazine (circulation 900,000). Boys may subscribe to Boys' Life magazine (circulation 1.3 million). Both are published by the Boy Scouts of America. Also available are a number of Cub Scout and leader publications, including the Wolf Cub Scout Book, Bear Cub Scout Book, Webelos Scout Book, Cub Scout Leader Book, Cub Scout Program Helps, and Webelos Leader Guide.   For a list of useful information, check here http://www.scouting.org/scoutsource/CubScouts/Parents/Literature.aspx

 

Cub Scouting Ideals
Apart from the fun and excitement of Cub Scout activities, a number of ideals are expressed in the day-to-day life of the boy and his leaders.

Cub Scout Promise
I, (name), promise to do my best
To do my duty to God and my country,
To help other people, and
To obey the Law of the Pack.

Cub Scout Motto
Do Your Best.

Law of the Pack
The Cub Scout follows Akela.
The Cub Scout helps the pack go.
The pack helps the Cub Scout grow.
The Cub Scout gives goodwill.

Colors
The Cub Scout colors are blue and gold. The blue stands for truth and spirituality, steadfast loyalty, and the sky above. The gold stands for warm sunlight, good cheer, and happiness. Together, they symbolize what Cub Scouting is all about.

To learn more about Cub Scouting, or to find out how to start, join, or support a pack, see the How to Join Scouting information.

 

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