Evaluating Your Project 

9.0.2.13 Evaluating the Project After Completion

Eagle Scout Service Projects must be evaluated primarily on impact—the extent of benefit to the religious institution, school, or community, and on the leadership provided by the candidate. There must also be evidence of planning and development. This is not only part of the requirement, but relates to practicing our motto to "Be Prepared." However, in determining if a project meets requirement 5, reviewers must not require more planning and development than necessary to execute the project. These elements must not overshadow the project itself, as long as the effort was well led, and resulted in otherwise worthy outcome acceptable to the beneficiary.

There may be instances where, upon its completion, the unit leader or project beneficiary chooses not to approve a project. One or the other may determine modifications were so significant that the extent of service or the impact of the project were insufficient to warrant approval. The candidate may be requested to do more work or even start over with another project. He may choose to meet these requests, or he may decide—if he believes his completed project worthy and in compliance—to complete his Eagle Scout Rank Application and submit his project workbook without final approval. He must be granted aboard of review, should he request it.

If it is thought a unit board may not provide a fair hearing a board of review under disputed circumstances may be initiated. (See "Initiating Eagle Scout Board of Review Under Disputed Circumstances," 8.0.3.2.) The risk in this approach—that the board may decide negatively—should be discussed with the Scout. But at the same time, the fact he is so convinced may point to a need to reevaluate what was done. Perhaps, despite the lack of final approval, the project did indeed meet the requirement.

At the board of review, if an approved proposal and any subsequent effort represents planning and development that was adequate to the project, and the project was well led and carried out to the satisfaction of the unit leader and project beneficiary, only in a very rare case would rejection result. It would have to be clearly established that Eagle Scout requirement 5—as written—was not completed. Under no circumstances may project approval at any point in the process be withheld for reasons that have nothing to do with the project.